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CAN/CSA-Z434-14 - Industrial robots and robot systems (Adopted ISO 10218-1:2011, second edition, 2011-07-01, with Canadian deviations and ISO 10218-2:2011, first edition, 2011-07-01, with Canadian deviations)

Publication Year:

  • 2014

Total Pages:

224

Publisher:

  • CSA

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CAN/CSA-Z434-14 - Industrial robots and robot systems

CSA Preface

This is the third edition of CAN/CSA-Z434, Industrial robots and robot systems, which is an adoption, with Canadian deviations, of the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) Standards 10218-1 (second edition, 2011-07-01), Robots and robotic devices - Safety requirements for industrial robots - Part 1: Robots, and 10218-2 (first edition, 2011-07-01), Robots and robotic devices - Safety requirements for industrial robots - Part 2: Robot systems and integration. This Standard supersedes the previous editions, published in 2003 and 1994 under the title Industrial robots and robot systems - General safety requirements.

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as "CAN/CSA-Z434" throughout.

The title for the CSA adoption of the ISO Standards has been changed to reflect the modification of the scope of the ISO Standards. The ISO Standards were developed by Subcommittee SC 2, Robots and robot devices, under the jurisdiction of the Technical Committee, ISO/TC 184, Automation systems and integration.

The adoption of the ISO Standards as a National Standard of Canada is an important step in the acceptance of design data for safety equipment traded on a worldwide basis. The CSA Technical Committee on Industrial Robots and Robot Systems determined that ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2 could be used as the basis for the new edition of CAN/CSA-Z434 because these Standards most closely reflected the committee's perspective on industrial robots and robot systems, and because adopting them fosters international harmonization.

This Standard was reviewed for Canadian adoption by the CSA Technical Committee on Industrial Robots and Robot Systems, under the jurisdiction of the CSA Strategic Steering Committee on Occupational Health and Safety, and has been formally approved by the Technical Committee. This Standard has been approved as a National Standard of Canada by the Standards Council of Canada.

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ISO 10218-1:2011 - Robots and robotic devices - Safety requirements for industrial robots - Part 1: Robots

Introduction

ISO 10218 has been created in recognition of the particular hazards that are presented by industrial robots and industrial robot systems.

This part of ISO 10218 is a type C standard as outlined in ISO 12100.

When provisions of a type-C standard are different from those which are stated in type-A or type-B standards, the provisions of the type-C standard take precedence over the provisions of the other standards for machines that have been designed and built in accordance with the provisions of the type-C standard.

The machinery concerned and the extent to which hazards, hazardous situations and events are covered are indicated in the Scope of this part of ISO 10218.

Hazards associated with robots are well recognized, but the sources of the hazards are frequently unique to a particular robot system. The number and type(s) of hazard(s) are directly related to the nature of the automation process and the complexity of the installation. The risks associated with these hazards vary with the type of robot used and its purpose, and the way in which it is installed, programmed, operated and maintained.

    NOTE - Not all of the hazards identified by ISO 10218 apply to every robot, nor will the level of risk associated with a given hazardous situation be the same from robot to robot. Consequently, the safety requirements, or the protective measures, or both, can vary from what is specified in ISO 10218. A risk assessment can be conducted to determine what the protective measures should be.
In recognition of the variable nature of hazards with different uses of industrial robots, ISO 10218 is divided into two parts. This part of ISO 10218 provides guidance for the assurance of safety in the design and construction of the robot. Since safety in the application of industrial robots is influenced by the design and application of the particular robot system integration, ISO 10218-2 provides guidelines for the safeguarding of personnel during robot integration, installation, functional testing, programming, operation, maintenance and repair.

This part of ISO 10218 has been updated based on experience gained in developing the ISO 10218-2 guidance on system and integration requirements, in order to ensure it remains in line with minimum requirements of a harmonized type-C standard for industrial robots. Revised technical requirements include, but are not limited to, definition and requirements for singularity, safeguarding of transmission hazards, power loss requirements, safety-related control circuit performance, addition of a category 2 stopping function, mode selection, power and force limiting requirements, marking, and updated stopping time and distance metric and features.

This part of ISO 10218 is not applicable to robots which were manufactured prior to its publication date.

Scope

This part of ISO 10218 specifies requirements and guidelines for the inherent safe design, protective measures and information for use of industrial robots. It describes basic hazards associated with robots and provides requirements to eliminate, or adequately reduce, the risks associated with these hazards.

This part of ISO 10218 does not address the robot as a complete machine. Noise emission is generally not considered a significant hazard of the robot alone, and consequently noise is excluded from the scope of this part of ISO 10218.

This part of ISO 10218 does not apply to non-industrial robots, although the safety principles established in ISO 10218 can be utilized for these other robots.

    NOTE 1 - Examples of non-industrial robot applications include, but are not limited to, undersea, military and space robots, tele-operated manipulators, prosthetics and other aids for the physically impaired, micro-robots (displacement less than 1 mm), surgery or healthcare, and service or consumer products.

    NOTE 2 - Requirements for robot systems, integration, and installation are covered in ISO 10218-2.

    NOTE 3 - Additional hazards can be created by specific applications (e.g. welding, laser cutting, machining). These system-related hazards need to be considered during robot design.
1DV Modify Clause 1 by adding the following:

Within this Standard, where IEC 60204-1 is referenced, NFPA 79 will be considered to meet the intent of IEC 60204-1.

Within this Standard, wherever the Canadian deviations specify "Part 1" or "Part 2", they are referring to the adopted ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2 Standards, respectively.

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ISO 10218-2:2011 - Robots and robotic devices - Safety requirements for industrial robots - Part 2: Robot systems and integration

Introduction

This part of ISO 10218 has been created in recognition of the particular hazards that are presented by industrial robot systems when integrated and installed in industrial robot cells and lines.

Hazards are frequently unique to a particular robot system. The number and types of hazards are directly related to the nature of the automation process and the complexity of the installation.

The risks associated with these hazards vary with the type of robot used and its purpose and the way in which it is installed, programmed, operated, and maintained.

For the purpose of understanding requirements in this part of ISO 10218, a word syntax is used to distinguish absolute requirements from recommended practices or suggested actions. The word "shall" is used to identify requirements necessary for compliance with this part of ISO 10218. Such requirements have to be accomplished unless an alternative instruction is provided or a suitable alternative is determined by a risk assessment. The word "should" is used to identify suggestions, recommended actions or possible solutions for requirements, but alternatives are possible and the suggested actions are not absolute.

In recognition of the variable nature of hazards with the application of industrial robots, this part of ISO 10218 provides guidance for the assurance of safety in the integration and installation of robots. Since safety in the use of industrial robots is influenced by the design of the particular robot system, a supplementary, though equally important, purpose is to provide guidelines for the design, construction and information for use of robot systems and cells. Requirements for the robot portion of the system can be found in ISO 10218-1.

Providing for a safe robot system or cell depends on the cooperation of a variety of "stakeholders" - those entities that share in a responsibility for the ultimate purpose of providing a safe working environment. Stakeholders may be identified as manufacturers, suppliers, integrators and users (the entity responsible for using robots), but all share the common goal of a safe (robot) machine. The requirements in this part of ISO 10218 may be assigned to one of the stakeholders, but overlapping responsibilities can involve multiple stakeholders in the same requirements. While using this part of ISO 10218, the reader is cautioned that all of the requirements identified may apply to them, even if not specifically addressed by "assigned" stakeholder tasks.

This part of ISO 10218 is complementary and in addition to ISO 10218-1, which covers the robot only. This part of ISO 10218 adds additional information in line with ISO 12100 and ISO 11161, International Standards for requirements to identify and respond in a type-C standard to unique hazards presented by the integration, installation and requirements for use of industrial robots. New technical requirements include, but are not limited to, instructions for applying the new requirements in ISO 10218-1 for safety-related control system performance, robot stopping function, enabling device, programme verification, cableless pendant criteria, collaborating robot criteria and updated design for safety.

This part of ISO 10218 and ISO 10218-1 form part of a series of standards dealing with robots and robotic devices. Other standards cover such topics as integrated robotic systems, coordinate systems and axis motions, general characteristics, performance criteria and related testing methods, terminology, and mechanical interfaces. It is noted that these standards are interrelated and also related to other International Standards.

For ease of reading this part of ISO 10218, the words "robot" and "robot system" refer to "industrial robot" and "industrial robot system" as defined in ISO 10218-1.

Figure 1 describes the relationship of the scope of machinery standards used in a robot system. The robot alone is covered by ISO 10218-1, the system and cell is covered by this part of ISO 10218. A robot cell may include other machines subject to their own C level standards, and the robot system can be part of an integrated manufacturing system covered by ISO 11161 which in turn can also make reference to other relevant B and C level standards.

Scope

This part of ISO 10218 specifies safety requirements for the integration of industrial robots and industrial robot systems as defined in ISO 10218-1, and industrial robot cell(s). The integration includes the following:

    a) the design, manufacturing, installation, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of the industrial robot system or cell;

    b) necessary information for the design, manufacturing, installation, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of the industrial robot system or cell;

    c) component devices of the industrial robot system or cell.
This part of ISO 10218 describes the basic hazards and hazardous situations identified with these systems, and provides requirements to eliminate or adequately reduce the risks associated with these hazards. Although noise has been identified to be a significant hazard with industrial robot systems, it is not considered in this part of ISO 10218. This part of ISO 10218 also specifies requirements for the industrial robot system as part of an integrated manufacturing system. This part of ISO 10218 does not deal specifically with hazards associated with processes (e.g. laser radiation, ejected chips, welding smoke). Other standards can be applicable to these process hazards.

1DV Modify Clause 1 by adding the following:

Within this Standard, wherever the Canadian deviations specify "Part 1" or "Part 2", they are referring to the adopted ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2 Standards, respectively.

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